What to Read

Every once in a while I like to post some great articles I’ve stumbled across on the web that I think will be helpful to my readers. Here are some great ones for you to consider looking over! Enjoy!

Twelve Ways Pastors Went from Burnout to Vision  by Thom S. Rainer
There are few vocations that can engender burnout like the pastorate. The demands on a pastor’s time, emotions, and energy can be overwhelming. When I was a pastor, I often felt at least the symptoms of burnout. I recently spoke with 17 pastors who had experienced burnout, or who felt they came precariously close to burnout. The good news about these pastors is that they moved out of burnout; and now they are re-engaging in exciting and visionary ministries. Read More.


10 Symptoms of an Inwardly-Focused Church  by Tony Morgan
Can you imagine a business that never focused on reaching new customers? Imagine Apple saying, “We have no plans to sell phones, tablets and computers to new customers in the future. We’re going to focus solely on our existing customers from now on.” For a season Apple would likely continue to thrive because it has plenty of existing customers. But, over time, Apple would slowly lose it’s customer base until eventually everyone has either started purchasing products from other companies or passed away. Read More.


Gather Stories as If Lives Are in the Balance  by Mark Howell
As important as quantitative measurement is, today we need to talk about gathering stories, the qualitative aspect of small group ministry. Why? Let’s just say that while your ministry intelligence depends on the numbers we gathered yesterday, lives actually hang in the balance and depend on the stories you gather. Read More.


Never Start a Ministry Without a Minister  by Rick Warren
Saddleback didn’t have an organized youth ministry until we had 500 in attendance at the church. We didn’t have a singles ministry until we had 1,000 people in attendance. And I’m glad we didn’t. It’s not because those ministries aren’t important. They’re vital! But God hadn’t provided anyone to lead them. Never create a ministry position and then fill it. Read More.


3 BIG Reasons People Leave Your Church  by Dan Reiland
Why do you think people leave your church? Why do you think people leave churches in general? We’ve read reasons (and I’ve written about these too) like: “I just didn’t get anything out of the messages.” Read More.


Leadership Development Insights From Ephesians 4  by Aubrey Malphurs
One of the constant struggles church leaders face is determining how to achieve alignment between congregational and pastoral expectations. If you are reading this, you likely are a Christian leader. You also are likely to attend a church that expects the pastors to do the ministry of the church (most do). After all, that’s what they hired you for, right? Wrong! Kind of…   Many churches hire their pastor looking for someone to do the ministry. People are busy, and the other staff is overloaded. Read More.


Preaching Without Words: 10 Things To Consider When Using Visuals  by Troy Page
Many of us grew up in a church where children and student ministry was fun, creative and caught our attention. Then as we grew older and started attending “big” church, everything seemed to get boring! Thankfully during the last twenty plus years, there has been a wave of new churches who place a value to make things more creative, exciting and interesting. One way this is done is when speakers use visuals such as props and videos to capture the attention of the audience. Read More.


The Lonely Pastor: Nine Observations  by Thom S. Rainer
The conversation took place just yesterday. A young man told me his dad, a pastor, recently committed suicide. He talked about the pain his father experienced in ministry as well as the intense loneliness. Though suicide is not an inevitable outcome, I do know the number of pastors experiencing loneliness is high—very high.  Read More.


3 Pieces of Advice from a Church Planter to Church Planters  by Ed Stetzer
Church planting is difficult, but a few simple actions can make it a bit easier. When I planted my first church in Buffalo in 1988, I was considered strange. People asked why I was planting a new church instead of pastoring an established one and wondered aloud if maybe I couldn’t land a real ministry job. Read More.

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