Guest Experience #5 – Tactical Planning

You ever have the mildly embarrassing situation where you are looking for something, like your hat or glasses, only to discover it’s on your face or on your head? It was so obvious we missed it.

In my final installment to this rather lengthy series on Strategic Planning I want to talk about something just like that. It’s called tactical planning. There are five key steps to Strategic Planning as outlined in the book, Being Strategic by Erika Andersen. Feel free to click on the links below to explore each step in the process as I walk through a hypothetical scenario where a church is trying to discover a way to encourage first time guests to return as second time guests. The focus of this series of blogs has been on the strategic process more than the solutions presented in the church scenario.

The Strategic Process includes Five Steps:

  1. Define the Challenge
  2. Clarify ‘What Is?’
  3. Envision ‘What’s the Hope?’ (Part 1 / Part 2)
  4. Face ‘What’s in the Way?’
  5. Determine ‘What’s the Path?’
Tactical Planning is the process by which we put flesh and blood on our strategic plan. It’s not enough to say, “Here’s what we want to do.” Someone needs to do it too!
In tactical planning you close the loop you created with Determine ‘What’s the Path?’ by answering several key questions for each strategic step:
  • What needs to be done?
  • Who will do it?
  • When will it be done or completed?
  • What resources will need to be created or released?
Let’s do it:
All right. We’ve identified the several strategy steps in Determine ‘What’s the Path?’  Here are a couple of those strategic steps with some tactical steps attached to them:
Build greeters into the Sunday morning experience.
  • What needs done?
    We need to recruit four greeters who will serve every other week on Sunday mornings.
  • Who will do it?
    The newly recruited Host Ministry Directors will serve as one couple and will recruit two more people.
  • When will it need to be done?
    Within the next 10 days.
  • What resources need to be created or released?
    None.
  • What needs done?
    We need to create a space for greeter supplies in the usher’s closet as well as name-tags for the ushers.
  • Who will do it?
    Pastor will identify space for greeter ministry. Host Ministry Directors will create name-tags.
  • When will it need to be done?
    Within the next 15 days.
  • What resources need to be created or released?
    Closet space. A budget of $50 for supplies.
Train ushers and new greeters in how to greet and host guests.
  • What needs done?
    We need to identify quality training material to use to train our hosts, probably through one or two books or an online resource.
  • Who will do it?
    Host Ministry Directors.
  • When will it need to be done?
    Within the next 15 days.
  • What resources need to be created or released?
    A budget of $50 for training resources.
  • What needs done?
    We need to schedule a training date and communicate said date to all greeters and ushers.
  • Who will do it?
    Host Ministry Directors.
  • When will it need to be done?
    Date will be chosen and communicated to all within 20 days.
  • What resources need to be created or released?
    Classroom space at the church.
  • What needs done?
    All preparations for greeter training including room setup, refreshments, training materials, etc.
  • Who will do it?
    Pastor and Host Ministry Directors.
  • When will it need to be done?
    By the designated training date.
  • What resources need to be created or released?
    $20 for refreshments. Paper supplies for training materials. Tables/chairs.
You get the idea. Amazingly, we often just assume someone will think of these things and they will get done all by themselves.

Go to “Guest Experience #5: Determine ‘What’s the Path?'”

Disclosure of Material Connection: Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will add value to my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

You may also like

One comment